Murals In Da House! – Denver’s Outdoor Art Galleries – Turn Up On This House Music Art Walk Mashup – Vibrant Artwork Blows Minds Like Mine

In my opinion, the city of Denver’s personality is very dynamically evolving before my eyes.

With the legalization of marijuana in 2013, the city is booming with new construction, progressive legislation, and appreciation for its natural beauty.  Nearly 39% of Denver’s population is under 30 years old.  The median age is 37 years!

Millennials really showed their true colors, passion, and creatively recently with the protests which are still active.  They let my old ass know who’s running the future, them!  The protests were filled with artists displaying their works.  Additionally, there were concurrent art festivals occurring, as the protests were going on in the background.  I have been changed by the art that I’ve seen.  I have an energized appreciation for, but not for art in a museum.  …Mural Art in the alleyways of the city. 

Prior to the coronavirus, I used to visit the Denver Museum of Art regularly.  Every first Saturday of the month it’s free.  Many of Colorado’s museums are free periodically throughout the year.  Due to the coronavirus, they are closed, without further notice.

Throughout the protest and pandemic, I have never been one to sit at home in fear, sickened by around-the-clock news.  I am still not regularly watching the news and am handling today’s crucial times optimistically.  I am out every day enjoying the scenes and sites of my beautiful city.

juan-nino-9GL3a_YDeSw-unsplash
Photo – Juan Nino – Denver, Colorado, USA

This week I filled my week with taking person art tours which took me to sections of the city that I did not know existed.  Well, I knew they existed, but I hadn’t visited them.  I don’t always have a lot of money to spend.  This blog spot is all out of pocket labor of love, and I survive off of limited income.  When I do have extra cash, I go out and buy the latest gadget to assist me in my creative passions.  I certainly don’t have money to spend in the restaurants and bars of the various art districts.  But my art tours were even more delightful and cost me nothing.

I recognize the impact of staying locked up in fear of ‘the monster’.  The mental strain is enough to make you sick, or crazy.  So, I get out.  For 3 days this week, I improvised.  I came up with an alternative to going to the museum each month.  All the right elements came together after that, at the right time.

After attending Denver’s Black Love Mural Festival I was so enamored in pride and inspiration of the creativity of younger-generation mural artists that I wrote about it in the post What Makes Denver Colorado’s Celebration So Special – The Mural Art Show Makes It Mo Betta.

After seeing each unique mural, I was so exhilarated that I created a video gallery of each piece of work of art, and included additional works, from each artists’ gallery.  The intensity of viewing a massive number of vibrant-colored expressions of life in murals gave me a greater appreciation for this creative form of expression.

This week, as a traveled my regular route to run errands I noticed that I had been affected by it.  I started to more carefully notice that Denver, Colorado is full of mural art, on the side of buildings, on-street traffic boxes, and as part of storefront design.  My city, Denver, Colorado, USA is an outdoor art gallery. 

It reminded me of art on the streets of Europe, Barcelona, Spain, specifically.  Check it out – Best Street Art Spots in Barcelona.  I remember the city of Barcelona is like an open-air museum.  I spent more time outdoors than in.  I never visited one museum in Barcelona.  The city was a museum, with the art of Picasso on government and office buildings.


Photo Barcelona Navigator - Col·legi-d’Arquitectes-de-Catalunya

All of the right elements came together this week because, while listening to house music on the Pandora and Spotify music streaming apps, in my mind I blended the ideas of the vibrant colors of the city’s mural art with the pulsating sound of house music, particularly the house music of the 1980s and 1990s.  I could see the idea then which has not become this post and video.


I listen to music in the foreground and background throughout the day, for chillin, inspiration, praise, exercise, and even in mediation, whatever I need at the moment.  Listening regularly to music streaming services, the music can get repetitive.  So, I decided to listen to archived house music.  I needed a morning pick-me-up while showering.

A few days prior, a Friend, gave me basic training in using my Panasonic Lumix DC-FZ80 DSLR camera.  We met at Denver Open Media, where I first began studying media a couple of years ago, community media.  He was an excellent instructor.  He is a dope photography, videography, and artist, he and his wife Kim.  He was very patient with me.  I had never really worked with my camera much.  I never felt rushed.  He conducted an actual class with me, on a photo shoot, in the editing lab, and gave me all the basics, enough to get me going.

On the photoshoot, we shot mural art in the alleys behind the Art District galleries, in the Art District on Sante FeWe were like alley cats, strolling down alleys adorned with graffiti-decorated trash dumpsters, against flamboyant mural masterpieces, painted mainly on garage doors and the back of building walls. 

The lesson excited me; the murals even more!  I could see me finally making use of my camera, which sat idle in the bag for over a year.  Between what I learned from him, at Denver Open Media and at Denver Community Media, complimented with YouTube training, I was nearly set!  OG was ready to do the damn thang!

So I ordered new equipment.  I couldn’t afford it but made the purchases as a commitment.  I learned early in my career, as a bank officer, that debt can trigger the achievement.  Hear me out.  When you have a goal or vision, an ambition, put your money where your mouth is.  The financial commitment will make you make good on the purchase.  It will motivate you to succeed.  Your visions mean nothing if you don’t make a serious commitment.  Going into debt on a dream can be a motivator.  It puts flesh on the bone of your dreams.

I purchased a smartphone camera (Samsung S20) with six lens, a gimbal, Zoom H1N audio recorder, and various other cables, gadgets, and gizmos.  I was like a child during Christmas waiting for Amazon to deliver, what I thought would come in one neat big box.  Instead, it came in six separate deliveries.  I was beholden to my home for a week.  Each of the shipping notifications’ delivery date was ‘by 9 pm’, on different days of the week.  Nonetheless, I had to wait patiently, incubating my ideas further.

By the time that everything arrived, I was really pumped to execute!  With Lumix, wireless speaker, and smartphone tuned to house music, I was set to tour the city of Denver’s mural art districts, starting with the alley where my friend took me, The Art District on Sante Fe.  I then headed downtown to take in more.  Because I have this gift, ya know?  The give of gab.  I spoke to people along the way who gave me other spots to check out.  I met a few artists too.

Check out the video that I created and the photos I shot below. It will give you the essence of what I saw and heard over the past few days.  I am just getting familiar with this camera, but I managed to get a few good ones.  Kevy


Virtual House Music Mural Art Walk Denver, Colorado – USA – Jul 3, 2020 – Kevy Michaels

Have a weekend of Independence friends! Start by checking out the video that I created to Celebrate Denver, Colorado’s Mural Art + House Music.  It’s a mashup!

If you can’t get to the museum, then check out this Virtual House Music Art Walk.  It’ll be like you were there.  Kevy


Denver Street & Mural Art Districts

RINO – ☒  – Visited

One of Denver’s creative hubs, River North Art District (RiNo) leans heavily on its industrial past, preferring to revitalize historic warehouses and factories rather than tearing things down. In that same spirit, it’s fitting that the district’s creative expression extends well beyond its galleries’ walls, with colorful and innovative street art around nearly every corner and an influential annual mural event called the Colorado Crush Street Art Festival in September.

THE ART DISTRICT ON SANTA FE – ☒  – Visited

The Art District on Santa Fe is a designated Colorado Creative District, with the largest concentration of art galleries in Colorado — more than 30 of them. The neighborhood is splashed in brilliant color and covered in artwork from head to toe, inside its galleries and outside on its doors, alleys, hallways, sidewalks, walls, mailboxes, windows…you get the picture.

EAST COLFAX –  ☒  – Visited

As one of its iconic neon marquees, East Colfax is abuzz with energy 24/7. Some of Denver’s best live music venues are here, and its solidly urban, slightly gritty nature is both a draw and incubator for artistic expression. With a grant program in the works, expect to see even more street art coming to East Colfax soon.

SOUTH BROADWAY – ☒  – Visited

As South Broadway undergoes a major renaissance — with theaters, music venues, bars, restaurants, galleries, and shops flourishing like mad — the district’s open-air art tradition continues to thrive as well. Much of it is more of the “renegade” strain of street art, with nearly every alleyway and side street on the west side of South Broadway sporting some kind of expression — from graffiti tags to elaborate masterpieces.

CONFLUENCE PARK –  ☒  – Visited

A hip enclave within the Highlands neighborhood, Confluence Park is nestled just east of I-25 where the South Platte River and Cherry Creek converge. The area enjoys acres of riverside parkland and a trendy collection of eateries, boutiques, and condominiums — plus a significant number of colorful paintings adorning bars, breweries, and building walls.


Highlights on the History of Mural Art

Mural art is art that is painted on walls.  The canvas is a wall. 

There is an argument as to whether murals painted on canvas then affixed to a wall qualify.  This is understandable because more creds go to mural artists who paint on location in the outdoors.

Murals date back to 30,000 BC from the earliest paintings in the Chauvet cave France. The largest numbers of paintings are from Egyptian tombs in 3150BC, Pompeii in 100BC-AD79, and Minoan places 1700-1600BC.

The best-known style of mural painting is Fresco, but there are many methods and techniques as shown by the Mexican muralism art movement that took significant root in modern times. The pioneers of this movement include Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco.

  • Murals are imperative in the world of art and the contemporary world because they bring art to the public and make people more aware of art.
  • Murals are also a communication tool. You can use a wall painting to communicate the message that you wish the public to know.
  • Murals affect the attitudes of the people passing by them. Everyone gets their understanding of the painting, and they, therefore, add aesthetic value to the areas that they are put up.

Read More – The History of Murals – April 27, 2017/in Educational /by Mural Form Team


History of House Music

House is a genre of electronic dance music characterized by a repetitive four on the floor beat and a tempo of 120 to 130 beats per minute.[11] It was created by DJs and music producers from Chicago’s underground club culture in the 1980s, as DJs from the subculture began altering disco dance tracks to give them a more mechanical beat and deeper basslines.[1]

The genre was pioneered by DJs and producers mainly from Chicago and New York such as Frankie KnucklesLarry LevanRon HardyJesse SaundersChip E.Steve “Silk” HurleyFarley “Jackmaster” FunkMr. FingersMarshall JeffersonPhuture, and many others. Its origins derive from within the Black American LGBT communities but have since spread to the mainstream.[12][13][14][15] From its beginnings in the Chicago club and local radio scene, the genre expanded internationally to London, then to other American cities such as New York City and Detroit, and has become a worldwide phenomenon ever since.[16] It has spawned numerous subgenres, such as acid housedeep househip houseghetto houseprogressive housetech houseelectro house, and many more.

House has had and still has a huge impact on pop music in general and dance music in particular. It was picked up by major pop artists like Janet JacksonMadonna, and Kylie Minogue, but also produced some mainstream hits on its own, such as “French Kiss” by Lil Louis (1989), “Show Me Love” by Robin S. (1992), or “Push the Feeling On” by Nightcrawlers (1992/1995). Many house producers also did and do remixes for pop artists. Until today, house music has remained popular on radio and in clubs while retaining a foothold on the underground scenes across the globe.  Read More


Why Does House Music Feel ‘So Damn Good’? – BY MARISSA TRIMBLE · OCTOBER 8, 2018

You may have heard of dopamine, a neurotransmitter found in the brain most commonly known for its association with feelings of happiness. When dopamine is released from a region in the brain known as the ventral tegmental area, it stimulates dopamine-sensitive neurons in other parts of the brain, namely the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and hippocampus.

Dopamine is released when we partake in rewarding and pleasurable activities that activate the aforementioned pathway. This includes activities essential to one’s survival such as eating and having sex, which our bodies reward us for. Furthermore, drugs such as nicotine, cocaine, and heroin boost dopamine levels. So, why does listening to music also trigger this response?

House music has particular qualities that make it ‘so damn good’. Beats per minute (BPM) plays a fundamental role in how humans process music. House music has an average speed of 120 to 130 BPM.  Interestingly, studies show that music that lies between 90 to 150 BPM produces greater feelings of happiness and joy as well as diminishing emotions associated with sadness 2. Tempo directly affects a person physiologically, namely their respiratory and cardiovascular system, by stimulating the sympathetic nervous system. Evidence has shown that the respiratory system exhibits a degree of synchronization with the tempo of the music with faster tempos increasing heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing rate, whereas a slower tempo produces the opposite effect. These effects on the cardiovascular and respiratory system explain how house music can generate feelings of excitement and happiness.  Read More


Articles

Mar 9, 2012,09:37am EST

House Music Has Become a Global Phenomenon – Mar 9, 2012,09:37am EST – Forbes – Dan Schawbel

Back in the early 1980s, Chicago club and radio DJ’s were playing various styles of dance and disco music. In the mid-1980s and 1990s, house music became a major fixation on the UK music charts. In the past decade, house music has become very popular in America because many artists have crossed over to the mainstream. Young people are now more interested in the chorus and beat of a song over the words, something that house music has capitalized on. They grew up with hip-hop music with loud bass and house music is a natural progression for them.

The Best Street Art Spots In Barcelona – Artspace Tours

Barcelona has a thriving street art scene where you can find amazing graffiti, urban art and incredible murals around every corner. It’s easy to spend hours getting lost in its colorful streets.  Read More

Pinterest Traffic Box Art Search – Check out images of really cool street art
Archbishop Carl Bean on the relationship Between Gospel and Disco

Kai_MG · Archbishop Carl Bean on the relationship Between Gospel and Disco


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Being cognizant of international visitors, I want to do all that I can to communicate wisdom globally for all.

Contact us at kevymichaelscontent@gmail.com

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